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UPDATE: Semi Truck Driver Never Hit Brakes Before Crash Killing 3 Year Old Boy

26 comments

I reported yesterday about a tragic semi truck crash in Georgia that killed a three-year-old boy from Ross Township, Pennsylvania. Sean Thornton died and the remaining members of his family were severely injured when a tractor trailer hit their minivan from behind on I-95 in McIntosh County, Georgia.

Aftermath Of Deadly Semi Truck Crash

ABC News affiliate, WTAE, in Pittsburgh has reported that the tractor trailer driver never even hit his brakes before plowing into the back of the minivan.

You can view the WTAE news story here.

Witnesses say the never saw the tractor trailer truck even slow down before it plowed into the family’s van, perhaps going 70 miles per hour.

Other news outlets also covered this tragic eighteen wheeler crash.

You can view the KDKA news coverage here.

You can view the WPXI news coverage here.

Georgia State Patrol troopers say the semi truck was speeding at the time of the crash.

Our thoughts and prayers continue to go out to the Thornton family, who must not only suffer their own injuries, but also the loss of their little boy, Sean.

Friends and neighbors mourned Sean’s loss also. Many described the Thornton family as a close-knit family who like doing many activities together. I cannot imagine their loss.

So far, the details of this tragic crash leaves many questions unanswered: Why did the semi truck driver, Willie Hill, not see that the interstate traffic was slowing down? Why did the trucker never even attempt to slow down or hit his brakes? Was he distracted? Was he tired? Had he fallen asleep? How far had he driven that day? How much did he sleep the night before?

Too many people have been killed by semi truck crashes and trucking accidents.

Nationwide, large trucks (known as tractor trailers, semi trucks, eighteen wheelers, diesel, big rigs, or commercial trucks) make up only about 3% of the vehicles on the road. However, they account for far more traffic fatalities. For example, in Missouri, semi truck crashes make up as much as 15% of traffic deaths. In Illinois, tractor trailer crashes cause more than 10% of traffic deaths.

Driving an 80,000 tractor trailer covering hundreds of thousands of miles is an awesome responsibility. Truckers and trucking corporations must be vigilant about safety.

It may be difficult to pinpoint the cause of a semi truck crash. It takes an experienced team of investigators – including accident reconstructionists, forensic pathologists, and truck driving experts – to determine the cause.

Visit our trucking accident web site to learn more about trucking accident safety or trucking accident investigation.

Learn more and become a fan of Langdon & Emison on Facebook.

26 Comments

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  1. up arrow

    This is a tragic story and my heart goes out to all involved in the accident.

    You know, I have seen Volvo and Mercedes commercials touting a new technology which uses sensors in the front of the vehicle to determine if it is travelling too quickly towards an immovable or slow-moving hazard (such as a stopped minivan), and also watched some impressive field tests of this safety feature on the UK TV program “Top Gear” (one of my favorites). If the benefits outweigh the costs of placing these devices in passenger automobiles, shouldn’t there be enough benefit to place them in trucks, which have a harder time stopping and are significantly more dangerous in a collision?

  2. Kevin Johnson says:
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    Interesting how this story talks about how many fatal accidents involve tractor-trailers but fails to mention that according to the NHTSA, 76% of accidents involving tractor-trailers are the fault of the other vehicle.
    Truck drivers are already more regulated than doctors, police and paramedics. More regulations will not fix the simple fact that far too many people fail to respect the fact that big trucks don’t handle like cars and can’t be expected to react like them when the drivers of cars do stupid things.
    I wonder how many accidents are caused by people in cars who are texting, reading, playing video games, watching movies on their computers, typing on laptops, putting on makeup, eating soup with a spoon, having sex, having sex acts performed on them, all while driving. These are just a few examples of things I have personally witnessed happening in cars while I was driving my truck across the nation.
    I have over 400,000 miles of driving a truck without a ticket or accident. How many people who driver cars every day can make that claim?

  3. Brett Emison says:
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    Kevin Johnson — Thank you for your comment and your exemplary service record while driving tractor trailers. I am sure you will agree with me that it is an awesome responsbility maneuvering an 80,000 semi truck with up to three separate trailers hundreds of thousands of miles.

    I am also sure you’ll agree that truck drivers need to be extra vigilant because conditions — driving conditions, road conditions, weather conditions — can change in an instant.

    This post is not a commentary on all tractor-trailer crashes and it is certainly not a commentary on your exemplary driving record. This post is an account of a horribly tragic crash that took the life of a 3-year-old boy.

    In this crash, the victim surely was not responsbile. Neither was his family. Rahter, an inattentive, distracted or sleeping truck driver plowed into this child’s vehicle at up to 70 miles per hour without ever hitting his brakes.

    I think we can all agree that this truck driver’s conduct was apalling and we should all strive to prevent this type of tragedy in the future.

    Thanks again for sharing your comments with us.

  4. Kevin Johnson says:
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    I agree where the conduct of the truck driver in question is concerned. I took exception to the tone of the article which, rather than focus on the driver in question, seemed to indict truck drivers and trucking in general. The vast majority of truck drivers are hard-working, conscientious drivers who are well aware of the awesome responsibility associated with negotiating the highways and roads of this nation while sharing that road with people who have no idea what they’re doing behind the wheel.
    I deal with people on a daily basis who routinely pull dangerous and foolhardy moves around me while blissfully unaware of how much danger they put themselves in.
    I noticed where one of your areas of concentration is trucking accidents. That would indicate a predisposition to assume the truck driver is at fault in any accident and would also explain the tone of the article in question. I guess making sure the perception of truckers as unwashed, tired, inattentive lunatics savaging the highways serves you well, especially when negotiating a settlement with an insurance company or standing in front of a jury on the odd occasions where a case actually goes to trial.
    Good evening and happy New Year!

  5. up arrow

    In the few years I spent on the road driving up to 1000 miles a week as a traveling salesman, I have to agree with Kevin that the vast majority of the truckers I encountered on the road were the more considerate, knowledgeable, and attentive of the highway’s drivers.

    We allow far too many poorly skilled, dangerous, aggressive drivers on the roads in this country, and should do more to keep others safe by educating them or removing them from our highways.

    I’d also have to agree with Brett in this case that it looks like something went terribly wrong where this accident is concerned, and it is hard to see how being plowed into from behind could be the van driver’s fault.

  6. Bonnie says:
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    Let me start out by saying that I come from a long line of truckers(grandfather, 3 uncles, etc.).And they were all careful. With that being said, The family in this accident was my niece, her husband and 3 children. All the comments are not meant to knock truckers but to state a FACT that this one trucker took the life of a very loving, sweet little boy, whom was loved dearly. Our family will never be the same again. I just want answers as to why this man was going 70 when the traffic was all but stopped and why he never hit his brakes(even if he couldn’t stop) Because of this a mother is in the hospital not only battling serious injuries but also having to come to gripes with the fact that her baby is gone. How do you ever completely get over this?

  7. Karen says:
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    Bonnie-
    I agree with your questions. It makes no sense- why did this truck driver not slow down at all? My daughter attends the same School that these kids did. It broke my heart to hear of this tragedy. The entire family has injuries, and they must cope with these as well as coping with the loss of their Son/baby brother. A simple trip to Florida ended in such tragedy.

    Obviously, new and stricter Laws are needed to prevent such tragedies… perhaps more frequent drug and ETOH checks, increased mandation of minimum times drivers are permitted to drive without rest, etc.

    This is the second truck related tragedy that claimed the life of a child in our area– do you recall the Morrison Family- a father and 2 of his 3 twins were killed on Rt. 8 because the moron who was driving that truck did not secure a Wood Chipper to the bed properly.

    My heart goes out to the Thornton Family….
    Karen

  8. Brett Emison says:
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    It takes a skilled team of investigators to find out the true cause of a tractor trailer crash. (read http://kansascity.injuryboard.com/tractor-trailer-accidents/tractor-trailer-accidents-cause-too-many-deaths.aspx?googleid=273182)

    Accident reconstructionists need to measure and photograph the crash site in order calculate the speed of the vehicles and how the vehicles moved during the crash.

    Forensic trucking industry specialists need to review log books, truck driver records, safety inspections and “black box” data. This information will show if the truck driver complied with state and federal laws regarding driving time, rest and maintenance.

    A forensic medical specialist should review the truck driver’s medical history and medical records following the crash to determine if the driver suffered from impediments like sleep apnea, diabetes, fatigue or was under the influence of drugs or alcohol at the time of the crash.

    These questions can be answered with the right team of experts and specialists.

  9. Karen says:
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    Brett-
    I am curious to learn about the Regulations that Truck Drivers must follow…. are there standardized rules, or do rules vary from State to State? Is there special form of Licensure- and follow up- in the manner of Continuing Education Requirements– (that may deal with safety issues, for example)… is there any mandation for drug or alcohol testing? Are there any Medical Check Up requirements?

    I am a BSN Nurse– with Nursing- there are Continuing Education Requirements that we must complete prior to License Renewal. Also- some Hospitals require mandatory drug testing for employees. Any type of a felony could result in loss of your License to Practice Nursing… a drug or ETOH related conviction could also mean loss of Licensure. Are there any regulations like this for Truck Drivers?

    My point is– we Nurses deal with life and death matters- so we must show Professional accountability….. Truck Drivers can also be viewed as having a contribution to life and death matters as well. A tired truck driver could kill people, a truck driver on drugs could injure people. A truck driver who does not properly care for his load, or his vehicle could also kill people. A Truck driver with a KNOWN Medical condition that would impair his driving could kill people. Responsible truck drivers will NOT do this…. I would love to know more info about what types of Professional Accountability Truck Drivers have.

    New and stricter regulations may be of some benefit. This of course, would cause difficulty for the “Good” drivers, they would suffer due to the behaviors of their peers who lack responsibility, good judgement and common sense.

    Our entire community is mourning the loss of this wonderful little boy…. I can’t imagine the pain that his family feels. Bonnie- you and your family continue to be in my prayers.
    Karen

  10. Truckie D says:
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    Karen -
    The rules regarding allowable hours of service for drivers are set by the federal government for commercial vehicles in interstate commerce. Some states have exemptions in their regulations for things such as trucks carrying farm products during harvest etc.

    Pre-hire, random, and post-crash drug and alcohol testing are mandatory. A test failure is pretty much the kiss of death for a driver’s career.

    A DOT physical is required every other year, except for passenger carrying drivers who are examined every year.

    Felony convictions (depending on what for) may or may not disqualify a driver from holding a CDL. Very few companies will hire or retain anyone with a felony for anything.

    There is no requirement for any kind of ongoing training or testing, which in my view is unfortunate. The company I lease to *does* require me to attend training classes at least twice a year, and pass a road test annually, as well as random drug/alcohol testing.

    As far as “new and stricter regulations” go, we already have plenty of regulations — we just need to enforce the ones that we have, and remove the bad apples permanently from the barrel.

    You might also want to visit my blog at http://truckied.wordpress.com/

    Here’s a question for you Karen — in the training (driver’s ed or whatever) that you received before getting your driver’s license, do you remember them even mentioning trucks?

    td

  11. Bonnie says:
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    Karen,
    Thank you and everyone for all the prayers. I would like to up-date everyone on how the family is doing. Dan and both the children have been discharged from the hospital. (Praise God!) Susan is still in the hospital but is now in what they call a regular room. She STILL has a long healing road ahead of her. Mentally and physically. Her dad(my brother-in-law) is hoping that she will be able to travel back to Pittsburgh by the end of the week but we’ll have to wait and see. Please keep the prayers coming. Thanks again!

  12. Karen says:
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    Bonnie-
    Thank you for the update. So many of us have been in a state of shock since we heard of the accident from Sister Karen at the School. The School is organizing a fundraiser- as well as a list of people who will make meals for the family upon their return home. We are all so sorry for the loss of little Sean- and will continue to pray for everyone. This accident should NOT have occurred….

    Truckie D- thanks for the info that you provided…this answers a lot of questions for me. I did take a peek at your blog- and will read more when my children are asleep. Re your question of “what I remember from Driver’s Ed about Trucks”…. 2 things come to mind…. I can remember trying to not be near 18 wheelers on the road because my Driver’s Ed. Class scared me! We were told that 18 wheelers may take longer to stop because they are carrying heavy loads…. we were also told to avoid being in “the blind spot” of large trucks. My classes were quite awhile ago, but I still can remember how I never wanted to even try to pass an 18 wheeler on the Road when I was a new driver!

    Based on what you wrote– it seems like many bases are covered… I feel that a continuing Education requirement would be a wonderful thing for all Truckers to have. What are your suggestions of how to, as you said, “remove the bad apples from the barrel”?

    As I mentioned previously, I am a Nurse- and have both “heard of” and “directly worked with” “bad apple Nurses”…. The State Board of PA sends all Licensed Nurses a yearly Newsletter that lists WHO (By name) has a violation…. and it also lists WHY they have the violation. There is a standardized system in place to weed out “bad apple Nurses”…. As a Group, Nurses have been lobbying to obtain restrictions on how much mandatory Ovetime Hospitals can demand us to work per week. We do this for the SAFETY of our patients.

    In your blog, you mentioned that most accidents involving trucks have been proven to be the fault of a car driver. This was NOT the case in regard to this situation. This family was traveling to Florida for a vacation…. the encountered a slow down in traffic— they slowed down…. and were rear ended by a driver who DID NOT EVEN TRY TO PUT ON HIS BRAKES !!!!! There is no snow in Georgia- no one can say that he slid into the Thornton’s car….. it makes no sense!!!! Now, a little boy who was loved and cherished by his family is gone…. and they will never be the same. This makes me feel so ANGRY.

    I am tired of hearing stories about children losing their lives due to the negligence of idiots. I appreciate your info- and I can see from your blog that you are a “Good Driver”… as I am a “Good Nurse”… what the heck can we do about the “bad apple Truckers though”?

    I want to include a link for you. I realize that this story is not related to an 18 Wheeler… it is related to a driver of a smaller truck- that was hauling a wood chipper….

    http://www.dangeroustrailers.org/uploads/latimesfourfrontpage.pdf

    You could search for other articles on this as well… this one shows a picture of the accident scene. The idiot who caused this accident did not secure the Wood Chipper properly, he also was under the influence of a Pain Killer while driving. Now, a dad, and 2 of 3 triplets are gone. Imagine how the wife, and surviving little boy now feel….

    I do NOT want to hear of more stories like this…. and I am anxiously awaiting reports of WHY the driver who caused the Thornton accident did not put on his brakes AT ALL….. There is NO EXCUSE for this…. even if he had a medical condition that caused him to black out- he should not have been driving….

    Perhaps I should start a Blog of my own…. I am not writing here to bash all Truck Drivers- I am bashing the IDIOTS who have killed innocent children, and who have caused on-going emotional grief and trauma for all family members of those who haved died. Accidents like these should never have occurred…. there is NO EXCUSE for this…. I better stop now….. before I scream!
    Karen

  13. Brett Emison says:
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    Karen,

    Thank you for your thoughtful and passionate comments. I agree that there are many, many good truck drivers on the road, but there are also many that you accurately refer to as “idiots”. Idiots for one or more of many things: not paying attention, driving too fast, driving too long, ignoring medical warning signs, falsifying log books, etc.

    As you’ve intuited, an idiot behind the wheel of an 80,000 semi truck can do a tremendous amount of damage and ruin the lives of many.

    Semi truck drivers are required to get a special license, called a CDL (commercial drivers license). Truckers are limited in the number of hours they can drive and certain rest requirements. Some trucking companies are progressive enough to require medical checks, background checks and periodic safety training — although the quality of these programs vary drastically from company to company.

    The problem is that most (if not all) truck drivers are ultimately paid based on the number of miles they drive. This gives truckers incentive to break the rules. In tight economic times like these, truckers can make more money by breaking the rules. They drive longer than they should. They rest shorter than they should. They drive too fast to get more miles traveled in a day or more trips made in a week.

    Many trucking companies do little to discourage such activity (some actively encourage it) because trucking companies also ultimately make more money the more miles a trucker drives or more trips the trucker can make.

    Investigating commercial truck crashes like this takes special skill and insider knowledge. Trucking experts – like the ones I work with – have a strong working knowledge of industry rules and regulations. They know how to find information from log books, personnel files, GPS devices, onboard computers, dispatch logs, etc. Fuel and credit card receipts can even be very telling about the driving time, rest time and speed the trucker has been traveling.

    Medical conditions are another issue entirely. The industry has not given enough attention to medical conditions such as sleep apnea, which can lead to driver fatigue and inattention. Quality medical experts are needed to review medical records and determine if a medical condition may have contributed to the crash.

    After this long answer to your question, my short answer is that truckers are held to several limits based on regulations and industry standards. However, many of these rules and regulations are frequently bent or broken entirely. It takes a good team of investigators to sort through the information to find out exactly what happened.

  14. Kevin Johnson says:
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    Mr. Emison, you appear to be little more than a run-of-the-mill ambulance chaser. You wield the threat of lawsuits like a club and your compassion/interest in the family affected goes only as far as your chances of getting a payday from a settlement from which you can reap your 1/3.

    I do feel bad for the family of the child that was killed. Unlike Mr. Emison who wants to make money off this tragedy while pretending to care about the family, I would rather find out the entire story before indicting anyone. The truck driver in question has been indicted, tried and convicted right here before he’s had any chance at all to tell his side of the story.

    Did a medical condition cause him to run into the vehicle? Who knows? Karen, you should know by now that not all medical conditions are diagnosed prior to an event, such as insulin shock or a previously undiscovered seizure disorder. Yet you, a nurse, immediately convicted the truck driver.

    What were the weather conditions that day? Angle of the sun? Road conditions? Was the terrain hilly? Was the road straight or was it on a curve? Where were the warning signs for the construction zone placed?

    These are just a few questions I can come up with off the top of my head. Questions Mr. Ambulance Chaser won’t ask and doesn’t want anyone else to ask because it could get in the way of his payday.

    Chances are that the truck driver wasn’t paying attention. I realize that and I don’t condone driving outside regulations. However I also don’t condone the attitude and predisposition to convict a person when they’re not here to defend themselves.

    Mr. Emison is using this forum as a way to test public opinion and potential arguments he’ll use to extort money from the trucking company and the truck driver. He won’t do it in the name of justice or compassion for the family of the victim, he’ll do it in a tireless pursuit of the almighty dollar, ethics, common sense and fairness be damned.

    The death of this child makes me sick to my stomach. I was a paramedic for 12 years prior to my career as a truck driver and the death of children still haunt me to this day. If the truck driver was negligent, I hope he pays for the rest of his life.

  15. Bonnie says:
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    Kevin, point well taken. As I stated before my family has alot of truck drivers but I am on the other side too as this was my niece and her family. I am waiting to see why this driver didn’t slow down or brake. I know that even if he braked he would not be able to stop, going at 70mph. But I would think he would have tried. As of right now my ONLY concern is with my niece and her family!!!

  16. Brett Emison says:
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    Mr. Johnson —

    I closed my eyes, counted to ten, and said a little prayer before responding to your comment.

    Your resorting to name calling and personal insults betrays your true character and motivation. I will not belittle myself by responding in kind. I will only say this:

    You, sir, do not know me. You, sir, do not know my motivation. I do not know this family. But I have seen their tragedy played out time and again.

    I have seen greedy trucking companies and negligent truck drivers falsify log books, drive beyond on-duty time limits, speed across the country and fail to maintain their vehicles. Your comments in defending this conduct and the driver in this crash betray your motivation, sir.

    You defend negligent truck drivers no matter what they do. In your mind, this driver did no wrong.

    We know through news reports and eye witness accounts in comments to these very posts that this driver was speeding. We know that this truck driver did not use his brakes before slamming into this innocent family and taking their child from them forever. Yet you defend this truck driver.

    Instead, you call me names, disparage my reputation and completely make up your assertion that my motive is solely for “the almighty dollar, ethics, common sense and fairness be damned.” And you do so in the name of some claimed “compassion” for this family who had their three-year old son stolen from them by this truck driver.

    Shame on you, sir.

    I have disparaged no one. In fact, I made clear that the vast majority of truck drivers are good, honest and safe people. In fact, you agreed with the premise that a few bad apples effect all of us. These few bad apples ruin families when they neglect safety behind the wheel of an 80,000 pound rig.

    I have shared my experiences and called to light this terrible tragedy. I am proud of my work helping real people whose lives have been ruined by tragedy. I am proud that I have helped the families of those who have been injured, paralyzed, maimed, burned and killed – not by any fault of their own – but by the fault of others. I am proud that I take the risk and responsiblity for giving my clients back just a portion of the life they have lost. None of my clients ever asked for their fate.

    You, sir, do not know me.

  17. Bonnie says:
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    Bravo Brett!

  18. Bradley Scott says:
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    Mr. Johnson, I normally don’t comment on stories such as this, but it seems you are way out of line in your response to this blog post. After reading your attack on the author, I was inspired to re-read this post to see if I missed something. After a third read, I fail to see where Mr. Emison makes any statement about truck drivers in general. Each of his comments is about the truck driver involved in this accident and the as-yet unanswered questions about WHY this tragedy occured.

    We all know some ambulance-chasing attorneys who are only chasing the “almighty dollar”. However, characterising all attorneys in that manner is just as bad as characterizing all truck drivers as redneck, hopped-up, renegades that will ignore all rules “in pursuit of the almighty dollar”. Clearly you don’t want to be stereotyped in that group, and it is shameful for you to let a few “bad apple” attorneys ruin the whole lot.

    I for one will give Mr. Emison the benefit of the doubt and trust that he, like you, is a good and decent, hard working person that wants to make life a little bit better for anyone he can.

    Shame on your Mr. Johnson. And to Mr. Emison, thank you for bringing to light this terrible tragedy. My thoughts and prayers are with the victims of this accident and their loved ones.

  19. Truckie D says:
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    Karen -

    As far as “removing bad apples from the barrel”, it’s actually in the process of being implemented. Motor carriers are given a safety score (the SAFER system), and there’s going to be a similar system for drivers.

    Unfortunately, there doesn’t seem to be a lot of enforcement activity regarding carriers with deficient safety scores, unless they’re *really* bad (or maybe get involved in a particularly nasty crash).

    As for Kevin’s comments, I do agree with some of them. I would also add that there could have been a mechanical failure — maybe the driver tried to apply his brakes, but they didn’t activate. A newspaper, blog or whatever is not an appropriate place for determining blame in a crash.

    As Brett said “It takes a good team of investigators to sort through the information to find out exactly what happened.” To this I would add that the process can also take a very long time.

    As I’ve written in other posts both here, and in my blog, there is an upside to large damage awards — for more about that, see my blog post here: http://truckied.wordpress.com/2009/05/05/hello-injuryboard-readers/

    td

  20. Bonnie says:
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    Karen,
    I wish to thank you and everyone who are taking time to think of ways to help Susan, Dan & the children.

  21. tblack says:
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    Name calling is such a waste. Just tell your story

  22. Bonnie says:
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    Good news, Susan is being released from the hospital today and is flying back to Pittsburgh. She still has along road to go with all her injuries but all the prayers are helping. Sean will be laid to rest on Saturday so please say an extra prayer for the family. Thank you all!

  23. Brett Emison says:
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    Bonnie – thanks for your many updates and this is, indeed, good news. I will continue to keep your family in my prayers.

  24. JANET says:
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    MY HUSBAND DROVE LOGG TRUCKS FOR OVER 20 YEARS AND OUR SON AND MY HUSBAND PRO RACED MOTORCYCLES FOR MANY YEARS. WE ALL TOOK TURNS DRIVING THE 38 FT MOTORHOME WITH A 20 SOME FT TRAILER TO GET TO THE RACES. WE VE SEEN SOME TRUCK DRIVERS MAKE MISTAKES DURING OUR JOURNEYS, HOWEVER WE’VE HAD SOME HARROWING EXPERIENCES WITH THE GENERAL PUBLIC ON THE ROADS. SOME STATES ARE WORSE THAN OTHERS. IN ONE STATE WE NOTICED IT WAS COMMON FOR THE GENERAL TRAFFIC TO JERK THEIR VEHICLE BETWEEN US AND THE VEHICLE IN FRONT OF US WHILE WE ARE GOING HIGHWAY SPEED. THEY’D DO THAT WITHIN ONLY A FEW FEET OF OUR FRONT FENDER COMMONLY. WE MIGHT HAVE A FULL TRAILER NOT TO MENTION THE SIZE OF THE MOTORHOME AND GOD HELP THEM AND US IF THEY NEEDED TO STOP SUDDENLY RIGHT WHEN THEY PULLED THIS MANEUVER AS FULLY LOADED WE COULDN’T STOP ON A DIME. WE WITNESSED THIS HAPPENING ALL TOO OFTEN WITH BIG RIGGS ON THE ROAD. IT WAS ALMOST AS THE DRIVER OF THE SMALLER VEHICLE HAD A DEATH WISH. I THINK FOR PUPLIC SAFETY PART OF DRIVERS TRAINING SHOULD TEACH THE GENERAL PUBLIC HOW TO DRIVE AROUND LARGE TRUCKS. I THINK SOME PEOPLE DON’T SEEM TO KNOW THE DANGER THEY PUT THEMSELVES IN WHEN THEY JERK THEIR CARS IN FRONT OF A LARGE LOADED SEMI. ALSO WE’VE SEEN SOME PEOPLE HAVE ROAD RAGE IT SEEMED SIMPLY BECAUSE THEY COULDN’T SEE AROUND THE SEMI IN FRONT OF THEM

  25. JANET says:
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    MY HUSBAND DROVE LOGG TRUCKS FOR OVER 20 YEARS AND OUR SON AND MY HUSBAND PRO RACED MOTORCYCLES FOR MANY YEARS. WE ALL TOOK TURNS DRIVING THE 38 FT MOTORHOME WITH A 20 SOME FT TRAILER TO GET TO THE RACES. WE VE SEEN SOME TRUCK DRIVERS MAKE MISTAKES DURING OUR JOURNEYS, HOWEVER WE’VE HAD SOME HARROWING EXPERIENCES WITH THE GENERAL PUBLIC ON THE ROADS. SOME STATES ARE WORSE THAN OTHERS. IN ONE STATE WE NOTICED IT WAS COMMON FOR THE GENERAL TRAFFIC TO JERK THEIR VEHICLE BETWEEN US AND THE VEHICLE IN FRONT OF US WHILE WE ARE GOING HIGHWAY SPEED. THEY’D DO THAT WITHIN ONLY A FEW FEET OF OUR FRONT FENDER COMMONLY. WE MIGHT HAVE A FULL TRAILER NOT TO MENTION THE SIZE OF THE MOTORHOME AND GOD HELP THEM AND US IF THEY NEEDED TO STOP SUDDENLY RIGHT WHEN THEY PULLED THIS MANEUVER AS FULLY LOADED WE COULDN’T STOP ON A DIME. WE WITNESSED THIS HAPPENING ALL TOO OFTEN WITH BIG RIGGS ON THE ROAD. IT WAS ALMOST AS THE DRIVER OF THE SMALLER VEHICLE HAD A DEATH WISH. I THINK FOR PUPLIC SAFETY PART OF DRIVERS TRAINING SHOULD TEACH THE GENERAL PUBLIC HOW TO DRIVE AROUND LARGE TRUCKS. I THINK SOME PEOPLE DON’T SEEM TO KNOW THE DANGER THEY PUT THEMSELVES IN WHEN THEY JERK THEIR CARS IN FRONT OF A LARGE LOADED SEMI. ALSO WE’VE SEEN SOME PEOPLE HAVE ROAD RAGE IT SEEMED SIMPLY BECAUSE THEY COULDN’T SEE AROUND THE SEMI IN FRONT OF THEM

  26. Karen says:
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    Janet-
    Your experiences have nothing to do with this story. The people who were injured in this topic did not pull infront of the truck. The truck slammed into them without stopping! Read the articles that describe witness reports!

    A little boy is now dead….

    I do not understand why you typed in all caps— and why you felt a need to post your note twice!
    Karen